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The Archaeology of Liberty in an American CapitalExcavations in Annapolis$
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Mark Leone

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780520244504

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520244504.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 January 2022

The Importance of Knowing Annapolis

The Importance of Knowing Annapolis

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 The Importance of Knowing Annapolis
Source:
The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital
Author(s):

Mark P. Leone

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520244504.003.0001

This chapter, which introduces the city of Annapolis, a city that is deeply connected to the American Revolution and home to the United States Naval Academy, begins with a brief description of the city, and then examines the various identities normally associated with it. It shows Annapolis as a baroque city, which can be seen in the layout of the city and buildings that date back to the eighteenth century, and studies the way the wealthy and the poor, the powerful and the powerless, were managed without substantial violence. The chapter also discusses the population of Annapolis, the historical preservation of the city, and the ideology and theory presented in this book.

Keywords:   Annapolis, American Revolution, U.S. Naval Academy, identities, baroque city, wealthy and poor, population, historical preservation, ideology

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