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Earthquake NationThe Cultural Politics of Japanese Seismicity, 1868-1930$
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Greg Clancey

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780520246072

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520246072.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

. Japanese Architecture after Nōbi

. Japanese Architecture after Nōbi

Chapter:
(p.180) Seven. Japanese Architecture after Nōbi
Source:
Earthquake Nation
Author(s):

Gregory Clancey

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520246072.003.0008

The collapse of masonry buildings in Nagoya and Osaka in 1891 was a crisis for the Japanese architectural profession. The first response of Japanese architects was to attempt to make European brick-masonry more earthquake resistant. The production of Japanese architectural knowledge about the wooden world proceeded along two avenues in the years after Nōbi. One was the appropriation of the daiku-work of the past through the medium of architectural history (kenchikushi). The second was through the cultivation, if not the invention, of “Western carpentry” as a Japanese academic specialty.

Keywords:   masonry buildings, Japanese architecture, European brick-masonry, earthquake resistance, daiku-work, architectural history, Western carpentry

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