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From Afro-Cuban Rhythms to Latin Jazz$
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Raul Fernandez

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780520247079

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520247079.001.0001

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Lords of the Tambor

Lords of the Tambor

Chapter:
(p.99) Chapter Six Lords of the Tambor
Source:
From Afro-Cuban Rhythms to Latin Jazz
Author(s):

Raul A. Fernandez

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520247079.003.0007

The development of percussion of Afro-Cuban origin in Latin jazz and other U.S. music such as pop and funk after 1950 depends on the presence of several percussionists in addition to Mongo Santamaría. Among several important Cuban drummers, four stand out. This chapter recounts the percussion exploits of these four individuals who, together with Mongo, laid the rhythmic basis for the growth and development of Latin jazz between 1950 and 1990: Armando Peraza; Patato Valdés; Francisco Aguabella; and Cándido Camero. Each of them possesses very distinct and personal characteristics as a drummer, and all reached their pinnacle of success and visibility in different ways, in different U.S. cities, and, to a certain extent, in different periods. Taken together, these individuals provided a sound foundation for the continued expansion of that hybrid of hybrids, Latin jazz.

Keywords:   drummer, pop, funk, Latin jazz, U.S. music, Afro-Cuban origin

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