Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Promising GenomicsIceland and deCODE Genetics in a World of Speculation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Fortun and Roberto Reis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780520247505

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520247505.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 23 February 2020

SameXDifference

SameXDifference

Chapter:
(p.223) Ch 18 SameXDifference
Source:
Promising Genomics
Author(s):

Mike Fortun

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520247505.003.0019

Throughout the disagreements, differences and debates over the Health Sector Database and deCODE Genetics, there were at least two words that appeared everywhere: Iceland was “isolated” and its population was genetically “homogeneous.” The media ate it up. Einar Árnason, the population geneticist whose service to Iceland's National Bioethics Commission ended when it was dissolved, and who became a founder of and leading figure in Mannvernd, enters the story again. Among his dogged pursuits, none was as central to his scientific identity as the question of genetic variation—sameness and difference—in populations of organisms, from scallops to salmon to humans. Years before the scientific studies on the Icelandic population, and even before deCODE was incorporated, Kevin Kinsella of Sequana Therapeutics assumed he knew all he needed to know about the sameness of the Icelanders. Homogeneity, heterogeneity: same difference, different sales pitch.

Keywords:   Health Sector Database, deCODE Genetics, Iceland, Icelanders, Einar Árnason, genetic variation, sameness, difference, homogeneity, heterogeneity

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.