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George GershwinHis Life and Work$
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Howard Pollack

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780520248649

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520248649.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Girl Crazy (1930)

Girl Crazy (1930)

Chapter:
(p.465) Chapter Twenty-Five Girl Crazy (1930)
Source:
George Gershwin
Author(s):

Howard Pollack

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520248649.003.0025

The Gershwins spent the summer and early fall of 1930 working on another musical for Aarons and Freedley, Girl Crazy, to a book cowritten by Guy Bolton and John McGowan. A “girl-crazy” playboy, Danny, has been sent west by his father, who hopes that two years on the family's remote Buzzards Ranch in Custerville will reform him. Whatever its strengths and shortcomings, the book inspired one of Gershwin's most memorable scores. The setting surely played an important part in this regard, considering that the music drew on a variety of western idioms. The score located some common ground between urban jazz and western honky-tonk in such numbers as “Barbary Coast,” “Sam and Delilah,” “Boy! What Love Has Done to Me!,” and “I Got Rhythm,” whose swinging rhythms intimated a larger change in the jazz world related to western influence.

Keywords:   Vinton Freedley, George Gershwin, John McGowan, Alex Aarons, Custerville, urban jazz, I Got Rhythm

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