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Specialization, Speciation, and RadiationThe Evolutionary Biology of Herbivorous Insects$
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Kelley Tilmon

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780520251328

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520251328.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Sequential Radiation through Host-Race Formation: Herbivore Diversity Leads to Diversity in Natural Enemies

Sequential Radiation through Host-Race Formation: Herbivore Diversity Leads to Diversity in Natural Enemies

Chapter:
(p.188) Fourteen Sequential Radiation through Host-Race Formation: Herbivore Diversity Leads to Diversity in Natural Enemies
Source:
Specialization, Speciation, and Radiation
Author(s):

Warren G. Abrahamson

Catherine P. Blair

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520251328.003.0014

Sympatric speciation through formation of host races may present a situation where specialization and resultant diversification in one species cause diversification in another. Studies involving a number of taxa including fish, birds, crustaceans, mollusks, mites, and herbivorous insects indicate that reproductive isolation and divergence can take place sympatrically. This chapter explores five examples in which the genetic diversification of herbivores has created new resource opportunities that have been exploited by natural enemies, namely, host-habitat fidelity, plant-mediated host shifts and competition for a desirable niche, niche construction and niche-related selection, a more distant relationship with the host gall, and recurring local sequential radiation. It considers sequential radiation through host-race formation and how herbivore diversity leads to diversity in natural enemies. Finally, the chapter describes host-race formation in the parasitoid Eurytoma gigantea, which oviposits into the central chambers of fully grown galls induced by the goldenrod gall fly Eurosta solidaginis.

Keywords:   Eurytoma gigantea, Eurosta solidaginis, sympatric speciation, host races, sequential radiation, herbivores, diversity, natural enemies, host shifts, selection

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