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Public SociologyFifteen Eminent Sociologists Debate Politics and the Profession in the Twenty-first Century$
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Dan Clawson

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780520251373

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520251373.001.0001

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Do We Need a Public Sociology?: It Depends on What You Mean by Sociology

Do We Need a Public Sociology?: It Depends on What You Mean by Sociology

Chapter:
(p.124) Do We Need a Public Sociology?: It Depends on What You Mean by Sociology
Source:
Public Sociology
Author(s):

Lynn Smith-Lovin

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520251373.003.0008

This chapter expresses concern that public sociology will undermine the core task of professional sociology, that of cumulating knowledge for its own sake. While it has no objection to urging individual sociologists to become involved in civic life, it strongly opposes embracing value-laden activity within the disciplinary structure itself. Universities and the disciplines within them are not and probably cannot be hermetically sealed from the outside world. But given that, universities and disciplines should attempt to shield scholars from outside pressures of granting agencies as well as political movements.

Keywords:   social psychology, civic life, political movements, granting agencies

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