Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Interrupted LifeExperiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rickie Solinger and Rebecca Sharitz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520252493

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520252493.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Victim or Criminal: The Experiences of a Human-Trafficking Survivor in the U.S. Immigration System

Victim or Criminal: The Experiences of a Human-Trafficking Survivor in the U.S. Immigration System

Chapter:
(p.282) 55 Victim or Criminal: The Experiences of a Human-Trafficking Survivor in the U.S. Immigration System
Source:
Interrupted Life
Author(s):

Leticia M. Saucedo

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520252493.003.0056

In 2004, “Mae,” a Chinese woman who was a victim of human trafficking, was detained by the U.S. federal government for passport fraud as she tried to enter the United States through an international airport in the Southwest. Mae was incarcerated for several months in a contract detention center run by the local police department. The author of this chapter joined forces with students at the Thomas and Mack Legal Clinic in the law school at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, to represent Mae in her claims for asylum and release from detention. All of them witnessed the ways in which U.S. society increasingly equates the immigrant experience with criminality. The restrictive parameters and hostile attitudes of the immigration system encourage prosecution of immigrants rather than the determination of asylee status. In this chapter, the author tells the story of Mae, who became hideously vulnerable because of her immigrant status, her gender and youth, her poverty, and her distance from allies and family and familiar culture and language.

Keywords:   United States, human trafficking, immigration, criminality, detection, immigrants, asylum, poverty, gender

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.