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Interrupted LifeExperiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States$
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Rickie Solinger and Rebecca Sharitz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520252493

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520252493.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

The Forgotten Population: A Look at Death Row in the United States through the Experiences of Women

The Forgotten Population: A Look at Death Row in the United States through the Experiences of Women

Chapter:
(p.310) 60 The Forgotten Population: A Look at Death Row in the United States through the Experiences of Women
Source:
Interrupted Life
Author(s):

Capital Punishment Project, Women’s Rights Project, National Prison Project, National Criminal Justice Program, and the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520252493.003.0061

Since 1973, 148 women have been sentenced to death in the United States. As of December 2004, there were 50 women on death row. According to a report entitled “The Forgotten Population,” women's experiences on death row mirror many of the problems that have been documented in the cases of men condemned to death, such as inadequate defense counsel, poverty, alcoholism, drug abuse, mental retardation, and mental illness. However, in addition to facing these problems, numerous women on Death Row have also suffered abuse and domestic violence. A particularly disturbing finding of the report is the degree to which many of these incarcerated women live in virtual isolation, which often leads to psychosis or exacerbates existing mental illnesses. “The Forgotten Population” makes thirteen recommendations to improve conditions for women living on death row and to ensure that women receive fair and adequate defense counsel when charged with capital offenses.

Keywords:   The Forgotten Population, incarcerated women, death row, United States, abuse, domestic violence, capital offenses, psychosis, defense counsel

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