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Interrupted LifeExperiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States$
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Rickie Solinger and Rebecca Sharitz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520252493

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520252493.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

United Nations Report on Violence against Women in U.S. Prisons

United Nations Report on Violence against Women in U.S. Prisons

Chapter:
(p.45) 6 United Nations Report on Violence against Women in U.S. Prisons
Source:
Interrupted Life
Author(s):

Joanne Archibald

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520252493.003.0007

The report presented here was prepared in 1999 for the United Nations Human Rights Commission as part of an investigation of human rights violations around the world. The special investigator for violence against women, Radhika Coomaraswany, a lawyer from Sri Lanka, visited state and federal prisons in six U.S. states and the District of Columbia, taking testimony from many incarcerated women and prison employees. Coomaraswany's report highlights the fact that incarcerated women in the United States are disproportionately poor and black and many of them are there because they were unwittingly involved in drug trafficking. It also describes the unacceptable use of shackles on refugees and asylum seekers at the airport and on women in labor. The report calls for minimum standards of treatment to conform with U.S. obligations under international human rights treaties.

Keywords:   United Nations Human Rights Commission, human rights violations, incarcerated women, Radhika Coomaraswany, United States, drug trafficking, shackles, refugees, asylum seekers, women in labor

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