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What Is Medicine?Western and Eastern Approaches to Healing$
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Paul Unschuld

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780520257658

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520257658.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 24 September 2021

Integration and Reductionism in the Song Dynasty

Integration and Reductionism in the Song Dynasty

Chapter:
56 Integration and Reductionism in the Song Dynasty
Source:
What Is Medicine?
Author(s):

Paul U. Unschuld

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520257658.003.0056

Neo-Confucianism and existing social and economic structures were simultaneously a confirmation of the old and an impulse for something new in the late Song era. Chinese and Greek antiquities were incomparable in politics, society, and the economy. Both civilizations had produced a new medicine in spite of these differences. The patterns of society were applied to nature and then to the explanation of the organism in both civilizations. The simultaneous periods of the Early Middle Ages in Europe and the Tang dynasty in China were also incomparable in politics, society, and the economy. The High and Late Middle Ages of Europe and the Song, Jin, and Yuan eras of China were also incomparable in politics, society, and economy in the eleventh century. The old three-step repeated itself in the Song dynasty that involved the new formation of society, a new connection with nature, and a changed medicine.

Keywords:   Song era, Early Middle Ages, Greek antiquities, Chinese antiquities, Daoists

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