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GrassIn Search of Human Habitat$
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Joe Truett

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780520258396

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520258396.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

The Last Pariah

The Last Pariah

Chapter:
(p.93) Twelve The Last Pariah
Source:
Grass
Author(s):

JOE C. TRUETT

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520258396.003.0012

The black-tailed prairie dog, the most abundant of four prairie dog species in the United States, had shrunk in number to perhaps 2 percent of its original population and continued to decline because of plague and poisoning. This chapter describes the attempts to protect and conserve prairie dogs. The National Wildlife Federation, a respected mainstream conservation group, had submitted a petition to list the black-tailed prairie dog as a threatened species. Most states agreed to work in a loose organization called the Interstate Black-tailed Prairie Dog Conservation Team. However, campaigns about the prairie dog's destructiveness sold their eradication to the public. In 2004 an incumbent U.S. senator from South Dakota fell to a challenger who built a platform partly on prairie dog control. That same year the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dropped the black-tailed prairie dog from its list of candidate species.

Keywords:   black-tailed prairie dog, prairie dog, National Wildlife Federation, Interstate Black-tailed Prairie Dog Conservation Team, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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