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New PhiladelphiaAn Archaeology of Race in the Heartland$
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Paul Shackel

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780520266292

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520266292.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

The Apple Festival and National Significance

The Apple Festival and National Significance

Chapter:
(p.92) Chapter 7 The Apple Festival and National Significance
Source:
New Philadelphia
Author(s):

Paul A. Shackel

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520266292.003.0007

The Barry Apple Festival featured members of the McWorter family as representatives of the community's founder. Terry Martin suggested that the McWorter family members first meet at the archaeology lab at the Illinois State Museum before the festival, so that the goals and products of the first season's work at New Philadelphia could be explained. Racism had taken its toll on the New Philadelphia landscape. The McWorter family was interested in knowing more about Pike County. At the end of the field season, the archaeology team found several foundations related to the McWorter residence. They were all pleased that the University of Illinois team located the remains of parts of the complex once owned by Squire and Louisa McWorter. The physical remains are nice evidence of the McWorter family's being part of the town site. Key places and artifacts were found to help support the stories of education and freedom.

Keywords:   Barry Apple Festival, McWorter, New Philadelphia, artifacts, education, freedom, racism

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