Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Changing Inequality$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rebecca M. Blank

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520266926

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520266926.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

How Economic Shocks Change Income Distribution

How Economic Shocks Change Income Distribution

Chapter:
(p.116) (p.117) Five How Economic Shocks Change Income Distribution
Source:
Changing Inequality
Author(s):

Rebecca M. Blank

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520266926.003.0006

This chapter evaluates the evidence from past history, largely but not entirely within the United States, to indicate how major economic shocks appear to affect income distribution over time. It states that economic shocks include catastrophic events that occur at a particular point in time and may also refer to major economic changes that unfold more slowly over time, such as new technologies that expand productivity and create new opportunities for wealth creating, or the opening up of new frontiers and the availability of additional land and mineral resources. It explains that historical evidence indicates that the effects of a given economic shock are rarely predetermined but may be heavily influenced by the political institutions and the political economy of the nation when the shock occurs. It discusses that large economic shocks often influence public attitudes and political structures, creating new patterns in the distribution of economic resources as well as political access.

Keywords:   United States, income distribution, economic shocks, political institutions, political economy, public attitudes, political structures, distribution of economic resources, political access

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.