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Greater Sage-GrouseEcology and Conservation of a Landscape Species and Its Habitats$
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Steven Knick

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267114

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267114.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Molecular Insights into the Biology of Greater Sage-Grouse

Molecular Insights into the Biology of Greater Sage-Grouse

Chapter:
(p.84) (p.85) Chapter Five Molecular Insights into the Biology of Greater Sage-Grouse
Source:
Greater Sage-Grouse
Author(s):

Sara J. Oyler-McCance

Thomas W. Quinn

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267114.003.0006

Recent research on Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) genetics has revealed some important findings. First, multiple paternity in broods is more prevalent than previously thought, and leks do not comprise kin groups. Second, the Greater Sage-Grouse is genetically distinct from the congeneric Gunnison sage-grouse (C. minimus). Third, the Lyon-Mono population in the Mono Basin, spanning the border between Nevada and California, has unique genetic characteristics. Fourth, the previous delineation of western (C. u. phaios) and eastern Greater Sage-Grouse (C. u. urophasianus) is not supported genetically. Fifth, two isolated populations in Washington show indications that genetic diversity has been lost due to population declines and isolation. This chapter examines the use of molecular genetics to understand the biology of Greater Sage-Grouse for the conservation and management of this species and put it into the context of avian ecology based on selected molecular studies.

Keywords:   Centrocercus urophasianus, Greater Sage-Grouse, molecular genetics, paternity, leks, population declines, Mono Basin, biology, conservation, ecology

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