Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Making Chastity SexyThe Rhetoric of Evangelical Abstinence Campaigns$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christine J. Gardner

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267275

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267275.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 31 May 2020

“Someday My Prince Will Come”

“Someday My Prince Will Come”

The Fairy-Tale Narrative and Female Power

Chapter:
(p.63) Chapter 3 “Someday My Prince Will Come”
Source:
Making Chastity Sexy
Author(s):

Christine J. Gardner

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267275.003.0004

A key argument in the evangelical sexual abstinence campaigns is that delaying sexual gratification today means a greater prize of true love and romance tomorrow. This theme is communicated through the use of the fairy-tale narrative, complete with beautiful princesses in distress, valiant princes on horseback, and evil forces that threaten to steal the princesses' virginity. This chapter analyzes how the fairy-tale narrative both supports and subverts traditional gender roles. Young women may be waiting for their princes, but they are also taught that modestly covering their bodies exerts power and control over lustful young men. The young men, in turn, are actively pursuing and protecting their princesses, but they are also trapped and emasculated by their seemingly uncontrollable hormonal urges.

Keywords:   evangelical abstinence campaigns, sexual abstinence, fairy tales, young women, young men, gender roles, true love, romance

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.