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An Unfinished RepublicLeading by Word and Deed in Modern China$
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David Strand

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267367

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267367.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

Losing a Speech

Losing a Speech

Chapter:
(p.186) CHAPTER 5 Losing a Speech
Source:
An Unfinished Republic
Author(s):

David Strand

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267367.003.0006

One symbol of Sun Yat-sen's attainment as an orator was not that he rarely lost a speech. One result of a suffragist's more challenging role as a female orator was that she met with a mix of victories and defeats, applause, and heckling. Nationalist Party convention displayed Sun's skill in talking his way out of a shambles, a fortunate talent considering that his political career was studded with many disasters and near-disasters. Not everyone had Sun's capability with words and presence of mind in public. Political tools such as public speaking is vital not only when it becomes widespread and a source of power and influence but also when misuse or poor execution contributes to defeat. The need to persuade one's followers of a course of action, sell one's agenda, and in the bargain, explain oneself pushed and pulled a wide range of political actors to the podium.

Keywords:   orator, convention, Sun Yat-sen, execution, agenda

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