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Rallying for Immigrant RightsThe Fight for Inclusion in 21st Century America$
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Kim Voss

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267541

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267541.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

Out of the Shadows, into the Light

Out of the Shadows, into the Light

Questions Raised by the Spring of 2006

Chapter:
(p.250) 13 Out of the Shadows, into the Light
Source:
Rallying for Immigrant Rights
Author(s):

Roberto Suro

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267541.003.0013

The immigrant rights protests of 2006 were an unprecedented public mobilization in their size and character, but their lasting impact is not to be found through the measures usually applied to social movements: policies changed, candidates elected, organizations formed, and so on. This book has argued that the marches were a vivid public display of attitudes rarely expressed beyond Latino households and communities. Two lasting impressions from the 2006 protests were white T-shirts and children. Once the word spread, white T-shirts became the emblematic uniform of the marches. Also, the marchers came with children as if they were on an outing. Public opinion surveys conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center suggest that the marches reflected long-standing perceptions that discrimination is a problem for Latinos and Latino immigrants, perceptions that were heightened by the immigration policy debate. In the years after the marches, circumstances changed but many Latinos continued to see peril in the immigration policies of the United States.

Keywords:   United States, immigrants, protests, immigration, Latinos, immigrant rights, white T-shirts, children, discrimination, immigration policy

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