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Frontier FiguresAmerican Music and the Mythology of the American West$
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Beth Levy

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520267763

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520267763.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Copland and the Cinematic West

Copland and the Cinematic West

Chapter:
(p.351) 13 Copland and the Cinematic West
Source:
Frontier Figures
Author(s):

Beth E. Levy

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520267763.003.0014

This chapter focuses on Aaron Copland's film career, which began in 1939 at the World's Fair in New York City. Copland got his “big break” when Ralph Steiner and Willard Van Dyke approached him on behalf of the American City Planning Institute to score The City, a film portraying the evils of unregulated urban growth. With its evocations of small-town America, horrific industrial slums, and the improvements enabled by conscientious urban planning, his contribution to The City had the desired impact on Hollywood producers and directors, including Lewis Milestone, the man behind three of the most important film projects that Copland subsequently scored. The most immediate result of the Copland–Milestone connection was Of Mice and Men (1939).

Keywords:   American music, composers, Aaron Copland, films, musical scoring, Lewis Milestone, Mice and Men

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