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Rediscovering AmericaJapanese Perspectives on the American Century$
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Peter Duus

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520268432

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520268432.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

The American Occupiers

The American Occupiers

Chapter:
(p.181) Chapter 5 The American Occupiers
Source:
Rediscovering America
Author(s):

Peter Duus

Kenji Hasegawa

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520268432.003.0006

This chapter discusses American occupation of Japan after its defeat in the war with America. It notes that on August 15, 1945, the emperor's radio announcement telling his subjects to “endure the unendurable” was met by feelings of anxiety and relief, humiliation and anticipation. Occupation by American forces was surely better than a bitter fight to the death on the soil of the homeland, but no one could be sure just how the American “beasts” would behave as conquerors. The chapter reports that the Japanese central government cautioned local authorities to prepare for friction with the American troops, and authorized the use of funds and materials to build “recreation facilities” (i.e. brothels, dance halls, and cabarets) to protect innocent Japanese women from molestation by American soldiers.

Keywords:   American occupation, war, emperor, Japan, recreation facilities

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