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ClarkThe Autobiography of Clark Terry$
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Clark Terry and Gwen Terry

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520268463

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520268463.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 29 May 2020

Working with Duke

Working with Duke

Chapter:
30. Working with Duke
Source:
Clark
Author(s):

Gwen Terry

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520268463.003.0030

This chapter describes Clark Terry's association with Duke Ellington's band and his experience of working with Duke. Duke made Clark understand the importance of listening to the totality of music. Clark also came to understand the importance of each section to the total piece, especially one's own section, and the contribution of one's own section, contrapuntally to the other sections. Dreams of having his own big band stayed in Clark's mind. During the eight years he spent with Duke, they recorded several concerts. It was in the August of 1954 that Clark got a chance to be a part of Dinah Washington's record date, the album of which, came out as Dinah Jams. As Clark describes, Duke seemed pleased with him most of the time. But the most difficult task that he had to master was learning what Duke's limits of tolerance were with him, where one was not supposed to cross the “limit line”.

Keywords:   Clark Terry, Duke Ellington, totality, Dinah Jams, limit line

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