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San Francisco in the 1930sThe WPA Guide to the City by the Bay$
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Federal Writers Project of the Works Project Administration

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520268807

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520268807.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

South of Market

South of Market

Chapter:
(p.271) South of Market
Source:
San Francisco in the 1930s
Author(s):

David Kipen

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520268807.003.0018

History has played fast and loose with that great segment of the city which sprawls southward from Market Street to the San Francisco-San Mateo County line. Athwart historic Rincon Hill, fashionable residential quarter of Gold Rush days, the streamlined approach to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge rises from an area of factories, machine shops, railroad terminals, “skid-road” hotels, and Greek restaurants. Westward from the water front-lined to Hunter's Point with warehouses, stockyards, and shipbuilding plants—the district spreads across Potrero Hill to the heights of Twin Peaks, Buena Vista Park, Mount Olympus, and Mount Davidson. A broad residential district whose most venerable landmark is Mission Dolores, occupying a sheltered coastal plain and adjacent hillsides, “The Mission” is San Francisco's workshop, where most of the city's working-class population live.

Keywords:   Market Street, San Francisco, San Mateo County, Rincon Hill, Gold Rush, Oakland Bay Bridge, Mission Dolores

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