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San Francisco in the 1930sThe WPA Guide to the City by the Bay$
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Federal Writers Project of the Works Project Administration

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520268807

Published to California Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520268807.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

San Jose

San Jose

Chapter:
(p.486) San Jose
Source:
San Francisco in the 1930s
Author(s):

David Kipen

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520268807.003.0026

At the heart of the rich Santa Clara Valley lies San Jose, ten miles below the southern end of San Francisco Bay. Center of a rich agricultural region, San Jose's busy downtown district is dominated by tall modern office buildings; but the greater number of its business blocks date from the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Along the shaded residential streets are hundreds of well-kept, old frame houses dating from the 1870s and 1880s, set among trim lawns and pleasant gardens. Despite its having been for 70 years a town where only Spanish was spoken, San Jose has retained surprisingly little of this heritage. For three generations it has been predominantly American. The Latin languages heard most frequently today are Italian and Portuguese.

Keywords:   Santa Clara Valley, San Jose, San Francisco Bay, downtown, Spanish, heritage, American, Latin, Italian, Portuguese

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