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Selected Works of D.T. Suzuki, Volume IIIComparative Religion$
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Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki, Richard M. Jaffe, Jeff Wilson, and Tomoe Moriya

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520269170

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520269170.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

Zen and the Study of Confucianism (Selection from Zen and Its Influence on Japanese Culture)

Zen and the Study of Confucianism (Selection from Zen and Its Influence on Japanese Culture)

Chapter:
(p.91) 12 Zen and the Study of Confucianism (Selection from Zen and Its Influence on Japanese Culture)
Source:
Selected Works of D.T. Suzuki, Volume III
Author(s):
Jeff Wilson, Tomoe Moriya, Richard M. Jaffe
Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520269170.003.0012

This chapter contains an excerpt from D. T. Suzuki's book Zen and Its Influence on Japanese Culture, published by The Eastern Buddhist Society in 1938, revised and republished by Princeton University Press in 1959 with the title Zen and Japanese Culture. Here Suzuki discusses Song philosophy and narrates a Zen-oriented intellectual history of China and Japan. In particular, he details the impact of Zen on the Neo-Confucianism of Zhu Xi and on Daoism, noting that Japanese Zen masters, mostly from the Rinzai school, studied Confucianism, following the tradition at contemporary Chinese temples. Suzuki claims that “Zen has nothing to do with nationalism.”

Keywords:   D. T. Suzuki, Zen, Japanese culture, Song philosophy, China, Japan, Neo-Confucianism, Zhu Xi, Daoism, Confucianism

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