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Selected Works of D.T. Suzuki, Volume IIIComparative Religion$
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Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki, Richard M. Jaffe, Jeff Wilson, and Tomoe Moriya

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520269170

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520269170.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

Letter to Mr. Tatsuguchi

Letter to Mr. Tatsuguchi

Chapter:
(p.161) 21 Letter to Mr. Tatsuguchi
Source:
Selected Works of D.T. Suzuki, Volume III
Author(s):
Jeff Wilson, Tomoe Moriya, Richard M. Jaffe
Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520269170.003.0021

This chapter contains D. T. Suzuki's personal letter to a Japanese American Buddhist which he addresses only as Mr. Tatsuguchi, presumably a lay member of the New York Buddhist Church (affiliated with the Jōdo Shin tradition). In reply to Mr. Tatsuguchi's letter, Suzuki expresses his opinions on the nature and limitation of Christianity and its difference from Buddhism. In particular, he describes Christianity as combative, whereas Buddhism conceives Amida in terms of Oyasama. According to Suzuki, Oyasama is something which Western religion lacks. He acknowledges that Christianity has many fine points, but argues that it ought to be complemented by Buddhist ideas. Suzuki believes that the world cannot be saved by Christianity alone.

Keywords:   letter, Western religion, Japanese American Buddhist, Mr. Tatsuguchi, New York Buddhist Church, Christianity, Buddhism, Amida, Oyasama

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