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Contested IllnessesCitizens, Science, and Health Social Movements$
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Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Stephen Zavestoski

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520270206

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520270206.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 04 August 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Environmental Justice and Contested Illnesses

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Introduction
Source:
Contested Illnesses
Author(s):

Rachel Morello-Frosch

Phil Brown

Stephen Zavestoski

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520270206.003.0001

This introductory chapter examines the relationship between contested illnesses and environmental health. Recent contested illness struggles have moved into the realms of environmental and ecological health, as mounting scientific evidence has linked environmental and human well-being. Disturbing trends in human health statistics, such as declining sperm counts, rising rates of fertility problems in young women, and increasing rates of breast, testicular, and prostate cancers suggest environmental causes. The prevalence of asthma and certain neurological problems in children also appear to be on the rise. Although environmental links to human disease remain strongly contested, scientific evidence suggests that increasing and pervasive chemical exposure where people live, work, and play may partially explain these trends.

Keywords:   contested illnesses, environmental health, ecological health, cancer, asthma, neurological problems, human health

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