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Contested IllnessesCitizens, Science, and Health Social Movements$
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Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Stephen Zavestoski

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780520270206

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520270206.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

The Personal Is Scientific, the Scientific Is Political

The Personal Is Scientific, the Scientific Is Political

The Public Paradigm of the Environmental Breast Cancer Movement

Chapter:
(p.147) 9 The Personal Is Scientific, the Scientific Is Political
Source:
Contested Illnesses
Author(s):

Sabrina McCormick

Phil Brown

Stephen Zavestoski

Alissa Cordner

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520270206.003.0009

This chapter describes the framework, history, and strategies of the environmental breast cancer movement, demonstrating the importance of understanding the fluidity of social-movement actors and developing the concept of a “boundary movement.” Boundary movements link the scientific and nonscientific realms, blur distinctions between laypeople and experts, and connect activist groups with nonactivist reform agents like public health officials. These movements sometimes employ “boundary objects” that have different meanings for diverse parties: for example, an air-quality monitor may represent an official data-gathering device for a government agency but a triumph of organizing success for a community group. The chapter specifically investigates environmental breast cancer movements in Massachusetts; Long Island, New York; and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Keywords:   environmental breast cancer movement, boundary movement, activist groups, public health officials

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