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Embodied EyeReligious Visual Culture and the Social Life of Feeling$
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David Morgan

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520272224

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520272224.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 26 October 2020

The Look of Sympathy

The Look of Sympathy

Feeling and Seeing

Chapter:
(p.137) Chapter 6 The Look of Sympathy
Source:
Embodied Eye
Author(s):

David Morgan

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520272224.003.0006

This chapter explores how seeing and feeling participates in the larger enterprise of affectively organizing social life. Philosopher Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments states that moral behavior is produced from feelings of approbation and censure that children encountered in the gaze of others, rather than innate principles. Children then learn to internalize this gaze and use it to scrutinize their own intentions and behavior. In addition, the chapter examines how images were used to generate sympathy in order to demontrate how the sense of community depends on both feeling for one’s fellows (sympathy) and feeling against certain others or aliens (antipathy).

Keywords:   Adam Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments, gaze, approbation, images, sympathy, antipathy

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