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Evolution's WedgeCompetition and the Origins of Diversity$
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David W. Pfennig and Karin S. Pfennig

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520274181

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520274181.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

When Character Displacement Occurs

When Character Displacement Occurs

Chapter:
(p.56) (p.57) 3 When Character Displacement Occurs
Source:
Evolution's Wedge
Author(s):

David W. Pfennig

Karin S. Pfennig

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520274181.003.0003

Clarifying the facilitators of character displacement is crucial for illuminating the origins of diversity. Six non–mutually exclusive factors are important: (1) standing variation; (2) strong selection; (3) ecological opportunity; (4) initial trait differences; (5) gene flow; and (6) a lack of antagonistic genetic correlations. Moreover, the occurrence of these factors can, in turn, generate variation in the incidence of character displacement. Additionally, whether or not ecological or reproductive character displacement transpires may also depend upon whether the alternative form of character displacement has also occurred. Once one form of character displacement occurs initially, it may then facilitate the other form by generating variation on which selection can act.

Keywords:   ecological opportunity, ecological character displacement, facilitators of character displacement, gene flow, standing variation, reproductive character displacement

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