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Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal MarshesThe San Francisco Estuary$
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Arnas Palaima

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520274297

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520274297.001.0001

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Bird Communities: Effects of Fragmentation, Disturbance, and Sea Level Rise on Population Viability

Bird Communities: Effects of Fragmentation, Disturbance, and Sea Level Rise on Population Viability

Chapter:
(p.175) Chapter Twelve Bird Communities: Effects of Fragmentation, Disturbance, and Sea Level Rise on Population Viability
Source:
Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal Marshes
Author(s):

John Y. Takekawa

Isa Woo

Karen M. Thorne

Kevin J. Buffington

Nadav Nur

Michael L. Casazza

Joshua T. Ackerman

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520274297.003.0012

Birds have distinct niches in San Francisco Bay tidal marshes, based on their foraging guilds and habitat associations. Urbanization has resulted in a static system with a less resilient avian community threatened by sea-level rise, disturbance, fragmentation, invasive species, and other stressors. Large-scale restoration has increased open habitats and waterbirds, but waterbirds will decrease in favor of tidal-marsh residents as marshes vegetate and mature. Understanding "bottleneck" periods such as king tides and storm events affecting survival, productivity, or dispersal may be key factors in maintaining avian populations. Linking the effects of habitat alteration and fragmentation to changes in vital rates of bird populations through viability analyses should help to identify which species are most at risk.

Keywords:   tidal range, marsh plain, wetland restoration, patch size, extreme events, invertebrates

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