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Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal MarshesThe San Francisco Estuary$
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Arnas Palaima

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520274297

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520274297.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Policy: Achievements and Challenges

Policy: Achievements and Challenges

Chapter:
(p.215) Chapter Fifteen Policy: Achievements and Challenges
Source:
Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal Marshes
Author(s):

Marc Holmes

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520274297.003.0015

It was not until 1965 that a state law was passed to regulate the unrestricted filling of the San Francisco Bay. By then, 92 percent of the bay's wetlands had already been destroyed. The law ushered in a new era of debate over the limits of private-property rights and the nature of public interest in protecting bay resources in an undeveloped condition. After initial US Supreme Court decisions affirming the public's right to restrict development in wetlands, recent decisions equivocate on the topic, raising questions about the future direction of federal wetland regulation, as well as about the future of a large-scale program of wetland restoration currently underway in San Francisco Bay.

Keywords:   developmentalist, Riverside Bayview Homes, SWANCC, Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County, Rapanos Decision, San Francisco Bay wetlands, Clean Water Act Section 404, Leslie Salt v. United States, McAteer-Petris Act

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