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Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal MarshesThe San Francisco Estuary$
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Arnas Palaima

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520274297

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520274297.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Natural and Restored Tidal Marsh Communities

Natural and Restored Tidal Marsh Communities

Chapter:
(p.233) Chapter Seventeen Natural and Restored Tidal Marsh Communities
Source:
Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal Marshes
Author(s):

Katharyn E. Boyer

Whitney J. Thornton

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520274297.003.0017

Restoration of the San Francisco estuary's tidal marshes has been focused on large-scale engineering solutions, while community composition and related ecological functions have received little attention in most projects. We evaluated plant-species richness and composition across twenty-one natural and restored marshes in the estuary, documenting fewer species in many of the restored marshes, some with only half as many species as in natural marsh remnants. Greater species richness tended to occur in marshes with gradual transitions to upland, heterogeneity in soil texture or topography, and close proximity to a seed source. We discuss how species identity and interactions can influence marsh functioning and consider ways in which greater species richness might be accomplished in upcoming restoration projects.

Keywords:   restoration, community, composition, identity, function, heterogeneity, interactions

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