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Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal MarshesThe San Francisco Estuary$
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Arnas Palaima

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780520274297

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520274297.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Current Issues in Tidal Marsh Restoration

Current Issues in Tidal Marsh Restoration

Chapter:
(p.253) Chapter Eighteen Current Issues in Tidal Marsh Restoration
Source:
Ecology, Conservation, and Restoration of Tidal Marshes
Author(s):

John C. Callaway

V. Thomas Parker

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520274297.003.0018

Approaches for tidal-marsh restoration in San Francisco Bay and Delta continue to evolve, with a focus on promoting the natural development of restored marshes. Allowing for natural marsh development enhances the physical and biological heterogeneity of restored marshes, including tidal-channel formation. The scope of restoration efforts within the bay and delta has increased substantially over the last few decades, with large-scale, regional efforts replacing smaller-scale, mitigation-based restoration. There has also been a growing focus on the restoration of brackish and freshwater tidal marshes, rather than just salt-marsh restoration. Finally, climate change has become a major consideration for current and future bay and delta restoration; major restoration concerns for climate change include evaluating its impact on marsh migration and connectivity, carbon sequestration, and invasive species.

Keywords:   adaptive management, carbon sequestration, climate change, invasive species, marsh migration, mitigation, regional restoration planning, spatial heterogeneity

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