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Black and Brown in Los AngelesBeyond Conflict and Coalition$
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Josh Kun and Laura Pulido

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780520275591

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520275591.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Fighting the Segregation Amendment

Fighting the Segregation Amendment

Black and Mexican American Responses to Proposition 14 in Los Angeles

Chapter:
(p.143) 5 Fighting the Segregation Amendment
Source:
Black and Brown in Los Angeles
Author(s):

Max Felker-Kantor

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520275591.003.0006

This chapter focuses on the responses of African Americans and Mexican Americans to Proposition 14—dubbed the antifair housing initiative—in Los Angeles, with particular emphasis on the interracial cooperation and tension that marked the battle against the proposed amendment to California's constitution that allowed homeowners and landlords to sell or rent—or refuse to sell or rent—their property to anyone they wished. Proposition 14 was an effort in 1964 to basically overturn California's Rumford Fair Housing Act and to open the door once again to residential segregation. Activists, especially in the African American community, developed an intensive campaign to overturn the initiative. Early plans calling for cooperation with Mexican Americans never materialized. This chapter shows that Blacks were able to overcome their class divisions and close ranks in the fight against Proposition 14, whereas Mexican American remained a split community and vote.

Keywords:   residential segregation, African Americans, Mexican Americans, Proposition 14, housing, Los Angeles, interracial cooperation, California, Rumford Fair Housing Act, class divisions

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