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Black and Brown in Los AngelesBeyond Conflict and Coalition$
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Josh Kun and Laura Pulido

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780520275591

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520275591.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

Rainbow Coalition in the Golden State?

Rainbow Coalition in the Golden State?

Exposing Myths, Uncovering New Realities in Latino Attitudes Toward Blacks

Chapter:
(p.203) 7 Rainbow Coalition in the Golden State?
Source:
Black and Brown in Los Angeles
Author(s):

Matt A. Barreto

Benjamin F. Gonzalez

Gabriel R. Sánchez

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520275591.003.0008

This chapter examines Latina/o attitudes toward African Americans in California, and especially the extent to which Latinas/os may see themselves in competition not only with Blacks but also with other groups. During the 1970s and 1980s, Blacks and Latinos appeared close to forming a “rainbow coalition” that would work for the political and social benefit of both groups. In Los Angeles, Latinos were brought into the Bradley coalition over time and became important partners in electing African Americans to office in California. Using new measures that draw on the Latino National Survey, this chapter analyzes Latino perceptions of competition with Blacks across several sociopolitical arenas in California, including gaining access to jobs, education and schools, and city and state government employment and achieving political representation. It shows that Latinas/os are actually more competitive with other Latinas/os than with African Americans.

Keywords:   Latinos, African Americans, California, competition, Latinas, rainbow coalition, Latino National Survey, education, employment, political representation

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