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Black and Brown in Los AngelesBeyond Conflict and Coalition$
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Josh Kun and Laura Pulido

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780520275591

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520275591.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

Race and the L.A. Human

Race and the L.A. Human

Race Relations and Violence in Globalized Los Angeles

Chapter:
(p.233) 8 Race and the L.A. Human
Source:
Black and Brown in Los Angeles
Author(s):

Ofelia Ortiz Cuevas

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520275591.003.0009

This chapter explores issues of criminality, race relations, and racial violence in Los Angeles and situates race relations and human relations in the institutions that produce them as part of policing and imprisonment—what it calls a violent state arithmetic that unifies Black and Brown bodies at the point of deadly state violence. Focusing on the Los Angeles County Jail and the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, the chapter considers how we have collectively come to participate in a process of dehumanization that disproportionately affects African Americans and Latinas/os. It offers an archaeology of human relations discourse and policy in Los Angeles and shows that its earliest uses in the region were for the explicit purpose of maintaining wartime productivity. It argues that the dehumanization of those categorized as criminals is part and parcel of the human relations narrative as practiced in Los Angeles, the global city.

Keywords:   criminality, race relations, racial violence, Los Angeles, human relations, policing, imprisonment, dehumanization, African Americans, Latinas/os

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