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Black and Brown in Los AngelesBeyond Conflict and Coalition$
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Josh Kun and Laura Pulido

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780520275591

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520275591.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

What Is an MC If He Can’t Rap to Banda?

What Is an MC If He Can’t Rap to Banda?

Making Music in Nuevo L.A.

Chapter:
(p.373) 15 What Is an MC If He Can’t Rap to Banda?
Source:
Black and Brown in Los Angeles
Author(s):

Josh Kun

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520275591.003.0016

This chapter examines the Mexicanization of Southern California and its impact on the demographics of the region's radio markets by focusing on one song by the L.A. Mexican hip-hop duo Akwid: “No hay manera,” rapped in Spanish over samples of Mexican banda music. It considers three issues related to “No hay manera”: the ongoing Mexicanization of South Los Angeles in the context of economic globalization and deindustrialization, along with the significance of Mexican immigrants' identity to the social structures and economic circuits of contemporary Los Angeles; the ongoing transformation of Mexican migrant cultural expressions from banda and norteño forms to new urban hybrids based in genre mixing, bilingualism, and generational reinvention; and the extent to which the creation of local musical forms in Los Angeles is both the product of the global flows of commercial popular culture and the producer of them.

Keywords:   radio, Mexicanization, Southern California, hip-hop, Akwid, No hay manera, banda, Mexican immigrants, norteño, popular culture

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