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How the Other Half AteA History of Working-Class Meals at the Turn of the Century$
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Katherine Leonard Turner

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780520277571

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520277571.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Food and Cooking in the City

Food and Cooking in the City

Chapter:
(p.51) Three Food and Cooking in the City
Source:
How the Other Half Ate
Author(s):

Katherine Leonard Turner

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520277571.003.0003

Buying and cooking food in urban working-class neighborhoods offered its own set of challenges and rewards. Urban people had many opportunities to buy cooked food from bakeries, delis, small restaurants, and saloons. Buying prepared food allowed women to take on more wage work, and it freed homes from the heat of the stove. Producing food in the crowded city was difficult but not impossible. Some working-class people produced food for their families or to sell to others in the thriving ethnic communities of dense cities. Both local and family conditions affected each decision—to buy or to cook; the density that discouraged home cooking for some offered opportunities for entrepreneurship to others.

Keywords:   working class, cookery, restaurants, food habits, food marketing

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