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Animation, Plasticity, and Music in Italy, 1770-1830$
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Ellen Lockhart

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780520284432

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520284432.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 14 April 2021

Partial Animacy and Blind Listening in Napoleonic Italy

Partial Animacy and Blind Listening in Napoleonic Italy

Chapter:
(p.112) Chapter 4 Partial Animacy and Blind Listening in Napoleonic Italy
Source:
Animation, Plasticity, and Music in Italy, 1770-1830
Author(s):

Ellen Lockhart

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520284432.003.0005

Chapter 4 continues these considerations of the animated statue’s political resonance during the Napoleonic years, but with a particular focus on the ways in which this model was deployed to represent socialization on the stage. First, the chapter marks the final flourishing of the Pygmalion theme on Italian stages in the first years of the nineteenth century. Then it traces the ways in which these fantasies of a plastic-human threshold were relocated to the biological body. Pygmalion narratives came to be applied not only to statues but also to living humans with nonfunctioning senses.

Keywords:   socialization, sensing, blindness, aesthetics, plasticity

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