Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cross-National Public Opinion about HomosexualityExamining Attitudes across the Globe$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Amy Adamczyk

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780520288751

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520288751.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 26 October 2020

The Relatively Liberal Views of People from Catholic-Majority Countries

The Relatively Liberal Views of People from Catholic-Majority Countries

An Examination of Spain, Italy, and Brazil

Chapter:
(p.127) Chapter 5 The Relatively Liberal Views of People from Catholic-Majority Countries
Source:
Cross-National Public Opinion about Homosexuality
Author(s):

Amy Adamczyk

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520288751.003.0006

The fifth chapter focuses on Spain, Italy, and Brazil. These nations all have strong Catholic histories, but they vary in the extent to which residents find religion important. The Catholic Church cannot be described as particularly tolerant of homosexuality, but Catholic-majority nations tend to have more liberal residents than mixed Protestant and Muslim-majority societies. This chapter provides the rationale for why residents living in many Catholic societies tend to be more tolerant. The answer is related, in part, to a decline in religious belief, even as residents continue to affiliate as Catholic; a focus on the faith’s emphasis on social justice over strict adherence to religious precepts; and the type of relationship the church has had with these nations’ recent dictators.

Keywords:   Catholic, Spain, Italy, Brazil, social justice, dictators

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.