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Other CaliforniaLand, Identity, and Politics on the Mexican Borderlands$
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Verónica Castillo-Muñoz

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520291638

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520291638.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

The “All-Mexican” Train

Chapter:
(p.107) Conclusion
Source:
Other California
Author(s):

Verónica Castillo-Muñoz

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520291638.003.0007

This chapter summarizes key themes and presents some final thoughts. Looking back at how Baja California was transformed from a backwater to one of the most productive regions in northern Mexico, one could easily conclude that foreign investment was a catalyst for Baja California's dramatic economic success. But this is only part of the story. This book demonstrates that intermarriage, land reform, and migration were vital to the development of the Baja California peninsula and the Mexican borderlands. Without Asian, mestizo, and indigenous workers, it would have been impossible for the Compagnie du Boleo and the the Colorado River Land Company to become some of the most productive enterprises in Latin America. In the post NAFTA era, Baja California continues to be a strategic place for commerce and migration. The boom of maquilas (assembly plants) and agribusinesses persist in attracting migrant workers from different parts of Mexico.

Keywords:   Baja California, economic development, intermarriage, land reform, migration, migrant workers

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