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Eating NAFTATrade, Food Policies, and the Destruction of Mexico$
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Alyshia Gálvez

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520291805

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520291805.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Connecting the Dots, and Bright Spots

Chapter:
(p.189) 8 Conclusion
Source:
Eating NAFTA
Author(s):

Alyshia Gálvez

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520291805.003.0008

In the conclusion, the author “connects the dots,” by linking changing food systems, policies and food ways, and diet-related illness to larger trends in Mexico and the United States: the militarization of security forces at the border and beyond, the drug war, and the widening gap between these two countries that share a long border. The chapter also looks for bright spots: food cultivators, producers and artisans who defy the trends toward industrialization and provide alternative and utopian visions of a different kind of world where health, joy, food and the interpersonal relationships that food preparation and enjoyment produce are not so heavily shaped by transnational food corporations, or even by immigration, health, social, and food policies. An argument is made that in addition to calls to “think globally, and act locally,” responsible citizenship also requires us to see the way that trade policies act globally in our name and raise our voices against policies that promote profits over health, even far from home.

Keywords:   Justice, Capitalism, Post-migration, Post-labor

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