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Finding Women in the StateA Socialist Feminist Revolution in the People's Republic of China, 1949-1964$
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Wang Zheng

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780520292284

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520292284.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

When a Maoist “Class” Intersected Gender

When a Maoist “Class” Intersected Gender

Chapter:
(p.112) Four When a Maoist “Class” Intersected Gender
Source:
Finding Women in the State
Author(s):

Wang Zheng

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520292284.003.0005

In 1964 the CCP’s journal Red Flag openly criticized Women of China for its alleged bourgeois and revisionist line in its advocacy of “women question.” Investigating this mysterious case, this chapter discovers the crucial moment when the masculinist male authority in the Party successfully deployed a Maoist concept of class struggle to suppress ACWF’s efforts to transform gender relations, especially in the domestic setting. Underlying this attack on ACWF was personal entanglement among the top echelon of the Party. Political rhetoric camouflaged personal animosities; and the political was indeed inseparably blended with the personal. State feminist endeavors became casualties of personal politics, a case revealing marginalization of the ACWF in the power structure as well as drastic deterioration of the political dynamics in the CCP.

Keywords:   Maoist class struggle, “women question”, gender relation, the political, the personal, marginalization

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