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Us, RelativesScaling and Plural Life in a Forager World$
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Nurit Bird-David

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780520293403

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520293403.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 03 July 2022

A Continuum of Relatives

A Continuum of Relatives

Othering and Us-ing

Chapter:
(p.183) 6. A Continuum of Relatives
Source:
Us, Relatives
Author(s):

Nurit Bird-David

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520293403.003.0012

Foragers’ relations with others have been explored in terms of boundaries, intergroup relations, and othering, in studies that have paid little or no attention to the tiny-scale context of their plural life and their own imaginations of communities. This chapter explores the “edges” of a forager community and compares their and their nonforager neighbors’ respective concepts of groupness. The ethnography spans the recent entry of the word boundary into local discourse, and intermarriages and close friendships with distant relatives and with migrants (plantation workers who have settled in the foragers’ home). The analysis reveals the foragers’ inclusion of migrants with whom they closely associate as “us, relatives” and the migrants’ collectivization of their forager associates as Naiken people and themselves, contrastively, as non-Naiken.

Keywords:   Forager-other relations, boundaries, group concepts, intermarriage, intergroup relations [scalar biases, hunter-gatherers, South Asian foragers, plural life]

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