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Trespassers?Asian Americans and the Battle for Suburbia$
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Willow S. Lung-Amam

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780520293892

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520293892.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 20 May 2022

That “Monster House” Is My Home

That “Monster House” Is My Home

Chapter:
(p.138) Four That “Monster House” Is My Home
Source:
Trespassers?
Author(s):

Willow S. Lung-Amam

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520293892.003.0005

This chapter examines controversies over the building of large homes, or what some derisively call “McMansions” or “monster homes,” in established neighborhoods. Fremont's large-home debates reveal the different norms and values for single-family suburban homes and neighborhoods held by many Asian American and White residents in Silicon Valley. The chapter shows that the planning processes, development standards, and design guidelines adopted to deal with these conflicts largely reflected the interests of established White residents while marginalizing those expressed by Asian Americans. The debate highlights how planning processes and seemingly neutral regulations often employ dominant social and cultural norms about “good” and “appropriate” design that reinforce suburbia's established racial and class order.

Keywords:   large homes, McMansions, monster homes, monster houses, suburban planning processes, social norms, cultural norms, suburban development, development contests, racial order, class order

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