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Screw ConsentA Better Politics of Sexual Justice$
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Joseph J. Fischel

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780520295407

Published to California Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520295407.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 25 June 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

#MeFirst: Undemocratic Hedonism

Chapter:
(p.172) Conclusion
Source:
Screw Consent
Author(s):

Joseph J. Fischel

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520295407.003.0007

In the conclusion, I propose that thinking with autonomy and access, while thinking against consent, might reframe some of the central ethical and political questions #MeToo raises. For while some have argued that nonconsent is the common denominator of #MeToo’s wrongful sex and others have argued that sex discrimination is the common denominator, I suggest that neither nonconsent nor discrimination identify the core wrong of #MeToo’s wrongful sex. Instead, the pervasive problem underlining so many of the incidents that constellate #MeToo is men’s sense of sexual entitlement, their leveraging positions of power to exact sexual gratification, and the consequent undemocratic, asymmetrical distribution of pleasure. These problems, and not the problem of nonconsent, are the connective tissue across #MeToo stories and scandals. Querying how and why powerful men constrain (indexically) women’s autonomy and access, rather than presuming all such sex nonconsensual, is more politically generative for feminist movement.

Keywords:   #MeToo, sexual culture, sex discrimination, consent, affirmative consent, pedophilia, feminism

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