Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Being Christian in Vandal AfricaThe Politics of Orthodoxy in the Post-Imperial West$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robin Whelan

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780520295957

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520295957.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 25 November 2020

In Dialogue with Heresy

In Dialogue with Heresy

Christian Polemical Literature

Chapter:
(p.55) 2 In Dialogue with Heresy
Source:
Being Christian in Vandal Africa
Author(s):

Robin Whelan

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520295957.003.0003

This chapter argues that a sophisticated culture of Christian disputation continued in Vandal Africa. It explores an understudied cache of heresiological literature, written in all the genres that underpinned late-antique ecclesiastical controversies (letters, sermons, tractates, florilegia, question-and-answer texts, and dialogues). Their authors used familiar tropes to present their opponents as heretics and themselves as orthodox. Particularly significant are a (rather surreal) series of imaginary debate texts that presented Nicene church fathers like Athanasius and Augustine triumphing over historical Arian heretics like Arius and Pascentius. These virtual dialogues both mirrored and modeled various forms of real debate between Nicene and Homoian authority figures. The striking resemblance between these texts and those written by earlier Christian controversialists was not merely a continuity of literary form. These works suggest that the practical implications of controversy for Christian clerics remained the same.

Keywords:   heresiology, debate, florilegia, Vigilius of Thapsa, Athanasius of Alexandria, Augustine of Hippo, conciliar acts

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.