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Mock ClassicismLatin American Film Comedy, 1930-1960$
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Nilo Couret

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520296848

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520296848.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

Timing Is Everything

Timing Is Everything

Sandrini’s Stutter and the Representability of Time

Chapter:
(p.111) Chapter 3 Timing Is Everything
Source:
Mock Classicism
Author(s):

Nilo Couret

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520296848.003.0004

The modernization of an increasingly urban and industrial Argentina and the effect of modernity on the experience of time provide a backdrop for my discussion of the films of Luis Sandrini. More specifically, Sandrini’s films rely on the comedian’s stutter that literally disrupts the temporal continuum that film records. This chapter uses the stutter heuristically, figuring it within film texts, material film practice, spectatorial experience, and historiography. Radio sound aesthetics and sound technologies played an important role during the transition to sound, not only determining technological developments that affected film production, but also providing the material base for the nation’s nascent studios. Additionally, by focusing on Sandrini’s physical slapstick, this chapter discusses his films as staging a confrontation with standardized time both in terms of the reification of time in modernity and the standardization of film through the registration gate. Classical Hollywood may have aspired to a hermetic diegetic world, but Sandrini mocks classicism with a stutter that makes the world salient precisely because it acknowledges that the world “slips through our fingers.”

Keywords:   Luis Sandrini, Argentine cinema, stutter, salience, temporality, sound studies

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