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America's Lone Star ConstitutionHow Supreme Court Cases from Texas Shape the Nation$
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Lucas A. Powe Jr.

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520297807

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520297807.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

School Finance

School Finance

Chapter:
(p.96) Six School Finance
Source:
America's Lone Star Constitution
Author(s):

Lucas A. Powe Jr.

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520297807.003.0007

This chapter discusses the legal battles over school finance in Texas. Texas was an Anglo-ruled state with two minorities as second-class citizens: blacks and Hispanics. Hernandez v. Texas and the history of discrimination against Hispanics illustrate why any desegregation remedies had to consider Hispanics as well as blacks. That was the ruling in Cisneros v. Corpus Christi Independent School District, but the major case involving Hispanics was not litigated as racial discrimination but rather as a wealth discrimination case. The chapter examines this case, which involved the Edgewood Independent School District that filed a lawsuit claiming that it has been discriminatorily treated under the Equal Protection Clause. It also considers two other cases filed by Edgewood parents including Demetrio Rodriguez, called Edgewood II and Edgewood III, as well as the legal tussle over property taxes as a source of school funding in Texas and whether education was a fundamental right.

Keywords:   school finance, Hernandez v. Texas, Hispanics, racial discrimination, wealth discrimination, Edgewood Independent School District, Equal Protection Clause, Demetrio Rodriguez, property taxes, education

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