Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
America's Lone Star ConstitutionHow Supreme Court Cases from Texas Shape the Nation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lucas A. Powe Jr.

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520297807

Published to California Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520297807.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

Capital Punishment

Capital Punishment

Chapter:
(p.215) Twelve Capital Punishment
Source:
America's Lone Star Constitution
Author(s):

Lucas A. Powe Jr.

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520297807.003.0013

This chapter examines Supreme Court cases that were filed in Texas over the issue of capital punishment. When it comes to executions, Texas leads the nation by a wide margin. Between 1997 and 2000, Texas executed 132 people—significantly more than any other state since executions resumed after 1976. After the executions of Michael Richard and Carlton Turner, the Court started chipping away at capital punishment in the late 1960s. The chapter discusses cases relating to the constitutionality of the death penalty, including Branch v. Texas and Furman v. Georgia, as well as cases that came after thirty-five states and the federal government passed new legislation reinstating the death penalty. These include Smith v. Texas and cases involving Johnny Paul Penry, Robert Tennard, Jose Ernesto Medellin and Humberto Leal Garcia, Bobby J. Moore, and Duane Buck.

Keywords:   capital punishment, Supreme Court, Texas, death penalty, Branch v. Texas, Furman v. Georgia, Smith v. Texas, Johnny Paul Penry, Jose Ernesto Medellin, Duane Buck

California Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.